How to Become an Accountant

If you love numbers and figuring out puzzles, a future in accounting could be for you. Accountants range from tax professionals to auditors and have an extremely stable job outlook.

What is an Accountant?

How to Become an Accountant

Public sector accountants work for public accounting firms.

An accountant is a financial specialist that deals with the recording of monetary amounts. There are many specializations within the field of accounting. Some accountants function primarily as bookkeepers and controllers while others do complex audits for grants and non-profit organizations.

The three major areas of accounting are government employees, public sector employees and private sector employees. The focus of employees in these different institutions can often be quite different.

Accountants need to be extremely conscientious workers and they need to focus on the accuracy of their work above all else. Most accountants are required to have at least a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting or Business, but some may have an Associate’s Degree and experience instead.

Accountants also need to be very well-versed in the accounting software suites that are used throughout the industry. Some of these programs include Peachtree, QuickBooks and Timberline, but increasingly many companies are switching to web-based and cloud-based accounting solutions. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts an increase in accounting positions by 16 percent in the next decade.

What Does an Accountant Do?

$61,690
Bachelor's Degree
None
None
1,216,900
16%
190,700
Find Related CareersSOURCE: US Bureau of Labor Statistics
Accountants that are within the private sector will work for a company managing the company’s books and cash flow. An accountant usually begins as a staff accountant within a company and a company will usually have a financial controller in charge of their operations.

Accountants may be in charge of the paid bills, received bills or a mix of all of these. Accountants may also be in charge of the general ledger work and maintaining and compiling proper financial statements, depending on their seniority and their experience.

Public sector accountants work for public accounting firms. These firms usually specialize in taxes, cash management and auditing. A public sector accountant will usually work longer hours but will gain more experience than those in the private sector. They will usually specialize on a specific area of accounting and they will progress based on seniority.

How Do You Become an Accountant?

Accountants usually start out as staff accountants. An accountant will usually need to do an internship before they are hired if they wish to be hired by one of the major public accounting firms. There are only a handful of large national accounting firms and positions within these firms can be highly competitive. Accountants will usually do their internships while acquiring their Bachelor’s Degree in accounting.

On-the-job training and training through internships and school programs is extremely common through the accounting field. An accountant will usually need at least a little training before actually pursuing a career.

Many accountants begin in public accounting firms before moving on to the private sector. Public accounting companies tend to provide more background and more comprehensive training than private companies. Government positions are usually less highly paid but they get more time off and they have very structured promotion paths.

How Do You Advance as an Accountant?

Advancement as an accountant is usually a matter of seniority. In most large firms, a staff accountant that has been with the company longer than three to five years will be considered a senior accountant. Advancement can also be pursued through passing the Certified Public Accountancy exams.

There are four total CPA exams that need to be passed to become a Certified Public Accountant, in addition to state regulations that usually involve specific educational credits and hours worked at a CPA firm. The CPA exam, provided by the American Institute of CPAs, is very comprehensive, and most individuals need to study for the exam for months.

How to Become a Bookkeeper

Bookkeepers can work in many fantastic and unique industries, and bookkeepers are always necessary. The salary and job responsibilities of a bookkeeper can vary heavily, allowing employees to find the balance that suits them the best.

What Is a Bookkeeper?

How to Become a Bookkeeper

A bookkeeper is an individual that keeps track of all of a company’s transactions.

A bookkeeper is an individual that keeps track of all of a company’s transactions. If the bookkeeper works in the accounting department for a company they will keep track of that company’s transactions, while bookkeepers that work with accounting firms may sometimes have dozens of companies to keep track of.

Some bookkeepers are even self-employed, and they take on their own clients. All companies, from small startups to large corporations, are required to maintain accurate books. This allows self-employed bookkeepers to gain clients that can’t otherwise afford a dedicated bookkeeper.

In the past, bookkeepers needed to maintain their transaction listings on paper. Today, most bookkeepers use bookkeeping software such as Intuit QuickBooks. Bookkeepers need to be aware of the fundamentals of bookkeeping and accounting, but many of them do not have a formal education but instead have on-the-job training.

What Does a Bookkeeper Do?

A bookkeeper in a larger corporation may be responsible for a single aspect of bookkeeping. This can range from accounts receivable to accounts payable. Bookkeepers in smaller corporations will usually manage all vendor payments and customer receipts as well as the monthly bank reconciliations. Bookkeepers may be responsible for printing out financial statements and invoices depending on the size of the company.

Bookkeepers that work for themselves or for accounting companies will usually need to complete the books of many companies at the same time. This includes taking receipts and bank statements, entering in transactions and reconciling them.

$34,030
High School or GED
None
Moderate-term
1,898,300
14%
259,000
Find Related CareersSOURCE: US Bureau of Labor Statistics
Bookkeepers may be responsible for letting the company know when they are running low on cash or when they haven’t paid certain bills. A bookkeeper is also sometimes known as an accounting clerk or an auditing clerk, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Accounting clerks and auditing clerks are usually specialized forms of bookkeeper.

How Do You Become a Bookkeeper?

Bookkeepers usually have an Associate’s Degree in a field related to bookkeeping, though it’s not always necessary. Many bookkeepers get on-the-job training for their bookkeeping, but those that want to become self-employed or work for a larger company should usually have at least an associate’s degree. Bookkeepers with Bachelor’s Degrees can qualify to become accountants rather than bookkeepers.

Bookkeepers may sometimes enter into the field through administrative work, as there are many administrators that need to maintain light bookkeeping tasks. Smaller companies usually don’t require degrees for their administrators or bookkeepers.

A certification program is also available for bookkeepers through the American Institute of Professional Bookkeepers.To remain certified, most bookkeepers will need to maintain continuing education credits and will need to pass the applicable tests.

How Do You Advance as a Bookkeeper?

Advancement as a bookkeeper can be most easily acquired by getting a Bachelor’s Degree in accounting. Many of the same principles involved in bookkeeping will be involved in an accounting degree, and most bookkeepers will find the transition fairly straightforward.

Those that want to remain bookkeepers can slowly build their client base until they can enter into self-employment. There are many successfully self-employed bookkeepers that work from home or that maintain their own bookkeeping offices.

However, there are some services that cannot or should not be provided without a certified public accountant. Bookkeepers usually cannot become certified public accountants because they usually do not have the required educational credits to qualify, even if they do manage to pass the CPA exam.

 

How to Become a Certified Public Accountant

While it may take some time, becoming a certified public accountant is an excellent way to achieve job security and a high salary. Certified Public Accountants (CPA) can find their place within many industries and have very high mobility within their field.

What Is a Certified Public Accountant?

How to Become a Certified Public Accountant

To get certification, a CPA needs to pass all four sections of the CPA exam within a certain time frame.

A certified public accountant is an accountant that has passed all four sections of the CPA exam, taken the right educational credits and worked a certain amount of hours under the guidance of another CPA.

The exact requirements depend on state, with different states having more stringent requirements for certification than others. To operate as a licensed CPA, a certified public accountant needs to have certification within the state they are practicing in.

Certified public accountants perform many of the same tasks another accountant would, but they have expertise and act as a trusted professional. A certified public accountant may be in charge of audits, corporate taxes or other complex financial engagements. Certified public accountants also often become partners within CPA firms or become controllers in large companies.

What Does a Certified Public Accountant Do?

A certified public accountant needs to maintain their certification through the attendance of continuing education courses and maintenance of their CPA dues. Other than this, a CPA will usually have the same types of responsibilities as another accountant.

However, a CPA will often have other accountants underneath them. CPAs will often be either partners or senior accountants and will have staff accountants that they delegate tasks to.

Often, a CPA won’t do the actual accounting work but instead will review the work as it is completed. Reviewing work can be extremely important, and a CPA needs to have an extensive knowledge of accounting.

Certified public accountants should be able to look at the work papers for a client they have not worked on themselves and determine whether the work papers are accurate. A CPA is usually responsible for ensuring that all the work produced is done in compliance with Generally Accepted Accounting Procedures.

How Do You Become a Certified Public Accountant?

$61,690
Bachelor's Degree
None
None
1,216,900
16%
190,700
Find Related CareersSOURCE: US Bureau of Labor Statistics
A certified public accountant needs to have a degree in accounting. There are educational requirements for a certified public accountant. Those with a Master’s Degree in accounting will usually find it much easier to acquire their CPA as they will already have the required higher educational credits.

To get certification, a CPA needs to pass all four sections of the CPA exam within a certain time frame. The CPA exam is consistent on a national level and is intended to prove that the certified public accountant is knowledgeable about all aspects of public accounting.

Passing the CPA exam alone is not enough to become a certified public accountant. CPAs are usually required to have a certain amount of experience in the industry, which requires that they work under a CPA or with a certified public accounting firm.

The amount of hours required varies by state, but it can require up to six months of work in the field before an accountant has enough experience to acquire their CPA. The requirements of a CPA can be filled at the same time, so those studying and taking CPA exams can be acquiring their hours as well. The American Institute of CPAs lists the requirements for a CPA as the three Es: education, examination and experience.

Advancement as a Certified Public Accountant

A certified public accountant will usually advance by either becoming a senior accountant, becoming a controller for a larger company or gaining a partnership within the company they are with. Partnerships in the field of certified public accounting are extremely common.

Self-employed CPAs are also common in the areas of taxation, but accounting specialties such as taxation usually demand a partnership due to the high requirements of the field.

How to Become an Auditor

Auditing is a specialization of accounting that is perfect for those that are detail-oriented and good at solving puzzles. Auditors need to ensure that the books of a business are compliant with generally accepted accounting practices.

What Is an Auditor?

How to Become an Auditor

Auditors are simply accountants that have chosen to specialize in a certain field.

An auditor is an accountant that specializes in auditing. Many people believe that auditing involves the IRS. However, the IRS only employs a very small amount of the auditors throughout the nation. Most auditors specialize in auditing the books for corporations and non-profit organizations.

These auditors ensure that the books are being kept accurately for the shareholders in a company or for the government to ensure that grants are being used as they should be.

Auditors need to ensure that the internal controls of a company are up to par. There are many standards and regulations regarding different industries and an auditor needs to be able to identify flaws in the books regarding all of these.

Auditors need to be extremely conscientious about their work and need to keep comprehensive notes and checklists in regards to problem items. They will also need to create final reports regarding any issues found and how they need to be managed.

What Does an Auditor Do?

An auditor will usually work under a senior auditor or senior accountant. They will take the books and documents from a company and test these items for accuracy. Not only do the items need to be accurate, but they also need to tie in with other items to ensure that there are specific controls in place.

Auditors will often work very closely with a company and sometimes they will even work on-site at the company so they have access to all necessary documents. Due to this, auditors also need to be able to work well with people.

Auditors are required to maintain their knowledge of auditing procedures and accounting standards. Many will go to seminars and advanced training courses throughout their work.

$61,690
Bachelor's Degree
None
None
1,216,900
16%
190,700
Find Related CareersSOURCE: US Bureau of Labor Statistics
They will also usually be required to obtain their certification as a certified public accountant through the course of their work, but not all auditors have this certification and many do not have it when they first start.

How Do You Become an Auditor?

Auditors are simply accountants that have chosen to specialize in a certain field. Most accountants will need to work with a certified public accounting firm to become an auditor. Smaller firms often do not handle audits. Auditors can also work for the government, but this is usually a different type of audit that is usually handled on a personal basis.

An auditor begins on their career path by getting their Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting, as noted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. They usually then need to get hired by a certified public accounting firm and display an interest and talent in the auditing field.

How Do You Advance as an Auditor?

Most auditors will usually need to become a certified public accountant to properly advance within their field. However, auditors that are interested in remaining auditors will still be able to advance significantly by becoming senior auditors within their team if their company promotes based purely on experience.

Becoming a certified public accountant isn’t strictly required as an auditor, but all documents do need to be reviewed by a CPA.

This means that auditors that do not acquire their CPA will always need to have their documents reviewed by another person, and this can prevent them from moving forward. Auditors that are interested in procuring their certification can go through the same certification path that general accountants do. According to the American Institute of CPAs, this includes an exam, experience and special education.

How to Become a Business Manager

If you love the field of business and like the idea of buying the boss, you may be interested in becoming a business manager. Becoming a business manager usually requires extensive experience within the industry of your choice, but it comes with some fantastic rewards.

What Is a Business Manager?

A business manager is a general description for anyone that managers the workings of a business. Common industries include managers of construction companies, retail stores or financial firms.

How to Become a Business Manager

Business managers need to maintain an overview of all of the workings of a business.

A business manager may have different responsibilities dependent on the industry they are in and size of the company they are engaged with. The most common form of a business manager is a retail or food service manager.

Business managers need to maintain an overview of all of the workings of a business. This includes maintaining inventory, receiving financial statements, hiring employees, letting employees go and increasing the profitability of their company.

Many business managers will work very long hours but will be extremely well compensated. Business managers that delegate appropriately may not have to work the long hours that are usually required.

What Does a Business Manager Do?

A business manager is responsible for the overall operations of their business. Sometimes, a business manager may not be on-site but may instead connect with an assistant manager on premises.

A business manager may be responsible for the procurement of inventory and may need to make deals with vendors and clients throughout the day.

$101,250
Bachelor's Degree

None
2,136,900
5%
97,000
Find Related CareersSOURCE: US Bureau of Labor Statistics
Business managers can work in many types of industry, and may work with large corporations or even be self-employed at their own business.

Overall, a business manager’s goal is to maintain the profitability of a company through careful management of funds, assets, debts and personnel. Any aspect of a company could potentially cause the profits of a company to plummet if they are not carefully monitored.

Business managers need to be very people oriented and able to manage people as well as create deals. A business manager will usually work very closely with the owner of a business.

How Do You Become a Business Manager?

Becoming a business manager usually requires both a degree in business and experience within the field. Retail managers usually do not come from those skilled in fast food service and those in fast food service usually do not move into corporate management, however there are exceptions for those that have significant amounts of experience in their industry.

A business manager will often start out as an assistant manager first, but occasionally a business manager may be offered the position if they have the educational background to compensate for their lack of experience.

Degrees in the business management field include a degree in business management, business or even accounting. Business managers need to be current on many financial techniques in order to manage the business’s finances effectively. As noted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there are many opportunities and different careers that fall under the general heading of business and financial management.

How Do You Advance as a Business Manager?

A business manager may eventually want to become an operations manager. While a business manager usually only manages a single business, an operations manager or district manager will manage multiple businesses. This will usually require hours of dedication but will be repaid with higher pay and better benefits.

Business managers may also be interested in owning their own business or managing larger companies. A successful business manager can move into many industries. Those extremely skilled in the area of business management can become management analysts, a field that O*Net Online describes as growing faster than average.

How to Become an Office Manager

If you’re great with people and excellent at organization, a career as an office manager might be the right path for you. Office managers usually require significant amounts of experience, but not usually extensive education.

What Is an Office Manager?

Office managers need to handle all of the day-to-day operations of a company. In different companies, this can mean different things. The position of office manager is one of the few positions that have "manager" in the title that actually do not designate anyone in managerial capacity.

An office manager usually does not manage employees but instead is an advanced administrative professional.

How to Become an Office Manager

Office managers need to handle all of the day-to-day operations of a company.

Office managers may sometimes take on specific human resources duties but they are rarely responsible for firing or hiring individuals.

Often, an office manager will need to do light bookkeeping work. They may need to do faxes, copying and other administrative work such as answering a phone. Occasionally they may be in charge of interns or temp workers.

They will usually be responsible for the filing system and they will often be a resource for important contact information. The office manager will also often work very closely with their boss or supervisor to fulfill their needs.

What Does an Office Manager Do?

Office managers will usually open the office at the beginning of the day and close it at the end of the day.

$77,890
High School or GED
1 to 5 years
None
254,300
15%
36,900
Find Related CareersSOURCE: US Bureau of Labor Statistics
Office managers usually need to be on call to fill the needs of those within the office. This includes ordering office supplies as necessary and fixing office equipment as is required.

Office managers may be instrumental in resolving issues that come up within a company such as the internet services going down or urgent files needing to be pulled.

Office managers often need to know quite a lot about the work those within the office are performing to ensure that everything operates smoothly. They may need to ensure that documents are secured properly and they may also provide new employees with documents and provisional training.

Otherwise, the job of an office manager varies significantly based on the industry they work in. Many companies need office managers and administrative staff.

How Do You Become an Office Manager?

An office manager usually has years of experience within the industry as an administrative assistant. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, an office manager may have up to five years of related experience.

Usually an office manager does not have to have a degree, but larger companies may request either an Associate’s Degree or Bachelor’s Degree in business or administration. The position isn’t usually considered an entry-level position though there may be on the job training from a predecessor.

Office managers usually need to work full-time and many of them get overtime pay for the hours they work beyond the standard 40 hour work week. Office managers are usually salaried but are sometimes paid on an hourly basis. The pay and responsibilities of an office manager vary significantly based on the industry the office manager is working on and their experience within the field.

How Do You Advance as an Office Manager?

Office managers may be able to advance by being hired by larger companies. Executive assistants often require related skills but are offered more job freedom. Another field that is related to office management, according to O*Net Online, is the field of bookkeeping.

Many office managers need to perform light bookkeeping tasks, and those that enjoy the work may be able to branch into financial positions rather than stay within the administrative field. Financial positions can offer an excellent career path for those that enjoy it.

How to Become a Sales Manager

If you’re excellent at sales and love dealing directly with people, you may want to become a sales manager. A sales manager is a sales-oriented professional that manages a team of sales staff members.

What Is a Sales Manager?

A sales manager is a professional that manages a team of sales staff members. The sales manager is usually responsible for motivating these staff members to meet their goals and training their team.

How to Become a Sales Manager

Some sales managers are responsible for setting up discounts, promotions and other pricing structures in their store.

Sales managers need to be driven, motivated and energetic, and they need to be able to deal with people well. A sales manager will usually have from 1 to 5 years of experience in the industry, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and will be knowledgeable about the products and services being sold.

Sales managers usually, but don’t always, have a Bachelor’s Degree in a related field such as business management. While most sales managers work for retail companies, there are many other industries that require sales managers, such as software companies and production companies. The position of sales manager is expected to continue growing over the next decade, making it a field with economic stability.

What Does a Sales Manager Do?

A sales manager will need to oversee their staff members and ensure they are performing up to the standards set by the company. They may need to deal directly with clients should any complaints arise, and they may also need to do the hiring and firing of staff members at their location.

Sales managers may need to prepare budgets or view sales analysis charts to ensure that their company is performing properly. A sales manager may also need to figure out what their clients want and change their inventory and methods to suit this information.

$98,530
Bachelor's Degree
1 to 5 years
None
342,100
12%
40,100
Find Related CareersSOURCE: US Bureau of Labor Statistics
Some sales managers are responsible for setting up discounts, promotions and other pricing structures in their store. Sales managers are also responsible for the sales software, unless this is governed higher up in the corporate chain. Many managers will need to train staff members as they come in and many need to be highly skilled in delegating tasks to their other staff members.

How Do You Become a Sales Manager?

Becoming a sales manager usually starts with being a successful sales consultant. While some sales managers may enter into the field through an entry-level position with a degree, other sales managers usually have several years of experience in the industry.

Only the highest performing sales consultants will usually become sales managers, and they also need to be able to maintain very high satisfaction rates with their customers.

A sales manager needs to show that they can lead other sales personnel. Managers are usually highly motivated individuals that have a true interest and passion in the product they’re selling.

Managers will often undergo some form of on-the-job corporate training once they enter into the managerial level, and a sales manager may start as an assistant sales manager in a larger company.

How Do You Advance as a Sales Manager?

Sales managers advance by consistently achieving profits that are at or higher than corporate standards. Managers should also generate very few customer complaints and should be able to keep their staff members happy and motivated.

Sales managers may eventually become business managers or general managers, or they may be promoted into larger sales departments or given larger sales teams. Sales managers will sometimes be transferred to larger stores if management feels that their expertise could be worthwhile. Overall, a sales manager will usually be able to acquire promotions based on merit and their sales results.

How to Become an Operations Manager

If you enjoy dealing with complex tasks and believe you have the business acumen to make it to the top, you may be interested in a career as an operations manager. Operations management is a long-term career that may take many years to obtain, but is extremely worthwhile.

What Is an Operations Manager?

An operations manager is usually responsible for the management of multiple businesses. As an example, an operations manager may be responsible for several chain restaurants within the same district or a series of retail locations across the nation.

Operations managers need to take the information from multiple business managers on-site and determine the best ways to increase efficiency and productivity throughout the system.

The responsibilities of an operations manager will vary highly dependent on industry. Usually an operations manager will have a background of both experience and education that helps them with their management.

Operations managers usually have close to a decade of experience within their industry and are highly skilled and highly paid professionals. O*Net Online lists the field of general and operations management as a field that has a very bright outlook.

What Does an Operations Manager Do?

How to Become an Operations Manager

The responsibilities of an operations manager will vary highly dependent on industry.

An operations manager will work closely with the owner of the company and the managers under them to ensure that everything is running as it should and that any and all modifications that would increase the overall efficiency of a company are handled appropriately.

An operations manager usually won’t concern themselves with the small scale operations of a company but will instead work with the reports provided to them by the business management staff on-site.

Operations managers may or may not have the capacity to promote and fire business managers and many of their responsibilities and benefits will vary depending on industry. Operations managers will often need to consult the owner of the company and will need to discuss ways the owner’s goals can be met through the appropriate management of the company. Operations managers will also need to create their own reports from the reports given to them.

How Do You Become an Operations Manager?

Becoming an operations manager usually begins with either a Bachelor’s Degree or Master’s Degree in business. An operations manager will usually have anywhere from five to ten years of experience within their chosen field.

The normal career path is to become an assistant manager, then a manager, then a business manager and finally an operations manager or a general manager. Those very skilled at their work may be able to skip ahead through some of these promotions.

Operations managers need to show that they are dedicated to their company and that they are able to manage many complex tasks at once.

$101,250
Bachelor's Degree

None
2,136,900
5%
97,000
Find Related CareersSOURCE: US Bureau of Labor Statistics
Operations managers that do not have degrees may be asked to acquire their degree before their promotion to build a solid foundation of knowledge.

Operations managers in different industries may have more stringent requirements. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, financial managers tend to be higher paid than other industries and require more advanced credentials.

How Does an Operations Manager Advance?

Operations managers are extremely high on the corporate ladder. To become more advanced as an operations manager, an operations manager may move to a larger company or may even start their own company. Operations managers that show excellent results can easily move into larger corporations, and the larger the corporation is the more highly paid the position usually is.

An operations manager will usually be able to develop their career through the results they can show their company. Increasing a company’s profitability and networking consistently is an excellent path to success in this career.

How to Become a Managing Director

If you’re a goal-oriented individual that wants to climb the corporate ladder, a career as a managing director may be for you. Managing directors are also known as business managers, general managers, operations managers and even financial managers.

What Is a Managing Director?

The title of managing director can apply to a variety of occupations which have very similar features. Managing directors are usually individuals that are responsible for the operations of either a single company or multiple companies.

Managing directors are usually found in large corporations or chains. Occasionally, the title of managing director may be used in reference to the chief executive officer of the company.

The responsibilities and benefits of being a managing director will vary depending on the company that is being managed. If the managing director is simply the general manager or operations manager of a company they will usually be responsible for the financial and logistical operations of the company.

If the managing director is the CEO of a financial or wealth management company they may have additional responsibilities, especially in relation to the company’s investors and shareholders.

What Does a Managing Director Do?

A managing director will usually need to organize the company’s finances, personnel and other core assets.

How to Become a Managing Director

Overall, the managing director’s job is to make the company profitable and to keep it that way.

Managing directors are usually responsible for virtually everything the company does, which includes the overall revenue generation of the company, the marketing of the company and the eventual goals of the company. The managing director will usually need to create reports and presentations for the shareholders and investors within the company.

Managing directors will usually spend a significant amount of time going through the reports from the company and analyzing them. They may need to determine why sales goals aren’t being met or why customer focus has shifted.

Overall, the managing director’s job is to make the company profitable and to keep it that way. This can entail many tactics, including creative budgeting techniques. Managing directors will also need to advise the company owner or board on changes to income and expenses on a regular basis.

How Do You Become a Managing Director?

Managing directors usually have at least a decade of experience within the industry and they often have prior experience within the company itself. A managing director needs to be very familiar with business management strategies as well as the company they are working for. Most managing directors will have a business management Bachelor’s Degree or even a Master’s Degree to progress into the position.

General managers will usually become managing directors, and the career path generally begins by becoming an assistant director, regional director or department head. The specific path to promotion will often vary based on the company itself and its corporate culture and policies.

It may take many years to become a managing director but managing directors are highly paid and highly respected individuals. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the most profitable positions are with the financial market and the transportation market.

How Do You Advance as a Managing Director?

$101,250
Bachelor's Degree

None
2,136,900
5%
97,000
Find Related CareersSOURCE: US Bureau of Labor Statistics
Advancing as a managing director usually entails becoming the director of progressively larger or more profitable companies or by gaining shares within the company that the director is managing.

In terms of actual positions, there are few positions elevated above that of a CEO for a large corporation. Managing directors may obtain higher degrees and may network to acquire opportunities in either larger companies or companies that have more room for growth.

Overall, however, there are very few things that someone who has been a managing director in the past cannot obtain. Those interested in entering into related fields may consider entering into specific industries that are considered more lucrative, such as the area of financial and wealth management. According to O*Net Online, many managing directors may become self-employed consultants.

How to Become a Director of Fundraising

If you love charity work and want to become highly involved in the non-profit industry, becoming a Director of fundraising might be a fulfilling pursuit for you. A Director of fundraising need to be extremely personable, conscientious and driven.

What Is a Director of Fundraising?

The position of Director of fundraising is usually relegated to non-profit organizations and charitable organizations that need to procure gifts and donations from sponsors and high net worth individuals.

Directors of fundraising need to secure major gifts and funds and usually have a target amount they are required to meet. A Director of fundraising may need to identify donors that understand and are willing to donate to their program and may need to push to meet budgets.

Most charitable organizations will have a director or manager of fundraising, but larger corporations will require their directors to be extremely motivated to secure the funding they need. A director of fundraising may also need to work directly with a marketing or media department to create projects that will help in securing funding.

What Does a Director of Fundraising Do?

Directors of fundraising will need to both interact with existing donors and solicit donations from companies and individuals they believe would be interested in funding their projects. A director of fundraising usually focuses on larger donations or campaigns that are intended to bring in a high volume of donations. Ordinary donations will usually be handled by other sectors of the Fundraising department.

A director of fundraising may need to work closely with a board of directors to determine new avenues to pursue in terms of funding. Funding usually needs to be procured throughout the year to meet certain milestones, and the research and management a director of fundraising needs to do may be quite extensive.

Directors are also required to network as much as possible so they can reach out to the community as necessary. Directors usually report to a CEO or other executive officer.

How Do You Become a Director of Fundraising?

A director of fundraising will usually have extensive experience within charity and non-profit organizations and will usually have worked for at least a few years in the sector of fundraising. The position is a very unique position that requires on-the-job training.

Directors of fundraising will often have a background in either communications or marketing, and will usually need to work very closely with these teams.

How to Become a Director of Fundraising

Advancement as a director of fundraising is usually based on the ability to raise funding.

For this reason, those with backgrounds in marketing or communications are usually preferred. According to O*Net Online, most fundraising managers will have at least a Bachelor’s Degree.

Directors of fundraising usually have at least ten years of experience within the industry or professional experience within non-profit organizations. They should have experience leading other employees and should be extremely well-acquainted with the company they are working for. They should also have financial knowledge and enough of a background to develop appropriate revenue goals.

How Do You Advance as a Director of Fundraising?

Advancement as a director of fundraising is usually based on the ability to raise funding. Directors that can raise more funding will be able to work on and develop larger projects. Many directors of fundraising are extremely involved within their charities and wish to see them grow.

Those that can raise substantial amounts of funding can build upon this funding to expand their existing programs and add new programs into their charity’s offerings. Those that are highly successful in this field can also consider the related fields of marketing, sales and communications. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the related fields of public relations management is expected to grow at a faster than average rate.